Gulf Coast Bands Music Forum  
GCB Home Photo Gallery Links GCB Myspace
Go Back   Gulf Coast Bands Music Forum > Entertainment > News

Notices

News Discuss the news happening in your local area and any where else.


Reply
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 07-28-2009, 07:28 AM
Marc's Avatar
Administrator
GCB Senior Citizen
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Age: 38
Posts: 4,004
Rep Power: 170
Marc can sit with Marc and buy him a drinkMarc can sit with Marc and buy him a drinkMarc can sit with Marc and buy him a drink
Tough love for fat people: Tax their food to pay for healthcare

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/boos...ealthcare.html

When historians look back to identify the pivotal moments in the nation's struggle against obesity, they might point to the current period as the moment when those who influenced opinion and made public policy decided it was time to take the gloves off.

As evidence of this new "get-tough" strategy on obesity, they may well cite a study released today by the Urban Institute titled "Reducing Obesity: Policy Strategies From the Tobacco Wars."

In the debate over healthcare reform, the added cost of caring for patients with obesity-related diseases has become a common refrain: most recent is the cost-of-obesity study, also released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It finds that as obesity rates increased from 18.3% of Americans in 1998 to 25% in 2006, the cost of providing treatment for those patients' weight-driven problems increased healthcare spending by $40 billion a year.

If you happen to be the 1-in-3 Americans who is neither obese nor overweight (and, thus, considered at risk of becoming obese), you might well conclude that the habits of the remaining two-thirds of Americans are costing you, big time. U.S. life expectancies are expected to slide backward, after years of marching upward. (But that's their statistical problem: Yours is how to make them stop costing you all that extra money because they are presumably making poor choices in their food consumption.)


"Facing the serious consequences of an uncontrolled obesity epidemic, America's state and federal policy makers may need to consider interventions every bit as forceful as those that succeeded in cutting adult tobacco use by more than 50%," the Urban Institute report says. It took awhile -- almost 50 years from the first surgeon general's report on tobacco in 1964 -- to drive smoking down. But in many ways, the drumbeat of scientific evidence and the growing cultural stigma against obesity already are well underway -- as any parent who has tried to bring birthday cupcakes into her child's classroom certainly knows.

Key among the "interventions" the report weighs is that of imposing an excise or sales tax on fattening foods. That, says the report, could be expected to lower consumption of those foods. But it would also generate revenues that could be used to extend health insurance coverage to the uninsured and under-insured, and perhaps to fund campaigns intended to make healthy foods more widely available to, say, low-income Americans and to encourage exercise and healthy eating habits.

If anti-tobacco campaigns are to be the model, those sales taxes could be hefty: The World Health Organization has recommended that tobacco taxes should represent between two-thirds and three-quarters of the cost of, say, a package of cigarettes; a 2004 report prepared for the Department of Agriculture suggested that, for "sinful-food" taxes to change the way people eat, they may need to equal at least 10% to 30% of the cost of the food.

And although 40 U.S. states now impose modest extra sales taxes on soft drinks and a few snack items, the Urban Institute report suggests that a truly forceful "intervention" -- one that would drive down the consumption of fattening foods and, presumably, prevent or reverse obesity -- would have to target pretty much all the fattening and nutritionally empty stuff we eat: "With a more narrowly targeted tax, consumers could simply substitute one fattening food or beverage for another," the reports says.

Of course, the United States also would have to adopt extensive menu- and food-labeling changes that would make "good foods" easily distinguishable from the bad ones subject to added taxes. Not to worry though: Several European countries, most notably Great Britain, have led the way in this area.

And here's the payoff: Conservatively estimated, a 10% tax levied on foods that would be defined as "less healthy" by a national standard adopted recently in Great Britain could yield $240 billion in its first five years and $522 billion over 10 years of implementation -- if it were to begin in October 2010. If lawmakers instituted a program of tax subsidies to encourage the purchase of fresh and processed fruits and vegetables, the added revenue would still be $356 billion over 10 years.

That would pay for a lot of healthcare reform, which some have estimated will cost as much as $1 trillion to implement over the next ten years.

There can be little doubt that lobbyists for the food, restaurant and grocery industries would come out swinging on any of these proposals. But the report cites evidence of a turning political tide for proposals that would hold the obese and other consumers of nutritionally suspect food accountable for their choices. A recent national poll found that 53% of Americans said they favored an increased tax on sodas and sugary soft drinks to help pay for healthcare reform. And even among those who opposed such an idea, 63% switched and said they'd favor such a tax if it "would raise money for health-care reform while also tackling the problems that stem from being overweight."

-- Melissa Healy
__________________
GCB Myspace
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in Technorati
Reply With Quote

  #2 (permalink)  
Old 07-28-2009, 07:29 AM
Marc's Avatar
Administrator
GCB Senior Citizen
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Age: 38
Posts: 4,004
Rep Power: 170
Marc can sit with Marc and buy him a drinkMarc can sit with Marc and buy him a drinkMarc can sit with Marc and buy him a drink
So what do you think about this?
__________________
GCB Myspace
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in Technorati
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 07-28-2009, 11:07 AM
Razz's Avatar
Productive GCB Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Age: 39
Posts: 1,324
Rep Power: 165
Razz thinks they are the cool kid
Just because it makes sense financially doesn't make it the right thing to do.

There are two reasons I'm fat. I don't eat right and I don't move enough.

I like fatty foods. But I also love healthy foods. But there is a reason I don't eat as much healthy foods as I should. It cost too much money. So the argument is these taxes would drive the cost of unhealthy food up and therefor people wouldn't be able to afford it. But what about the price of healthy food? Will the cost of healthy food go down or will you receive some kind of incentive to eat healthy foods? Because if the price of food goes up and health food stays up then what are we going to eat? How can we afford to?

I'm all for the price of health food to go down because a lot of the healthy foods we buy are grown in America. We would be supporting our own that way. (If I have the choice to purchase strawberries grown in Mexico vs. strawberries grown in California, I go for the CA grown berries every time)

The other factor is activity. We all have the same amount of time in the day and some make time for working out while others don't. But say that to the single mom who works full time and then comes home to take care of her kids. Thinks she has enough time to work out half an hour every day? She probably does. But by the end of the day when she is sitting on the couch watching tv for an hour and chowing down on twinkies she is already exhausted.

Teach people to move. I think that would be a better answer
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in Technorati
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 07-30-2009, 10:46 AM
PITBOSS's Avatar
Band Whore
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Grand Bay
Age: 43
Posts: 482
Rep Power: 158
PITBOSS sperm just hit the egg
Life has gotten pretty easy compared with people born in the last century. They worked all day, which usually involved growing their own food, farming activities.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in Technorati
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 07-30-2009, 11:52 AM
The Wayniac's Avatar
Moderator
Productive GCB Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Daphne, AL.
Posts: 1,246
Rep Power: 162
The Wayniac is allowed to buy Marc a drink and leave right after
Obama wants to make everyone skinny like him.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in Technorati
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Top 10 Ways to Get More People to Your Next Gig Marc Tips and Tutorials 2 05-14-2008 01:28 PM
Want to die or get sick? Eat at one of these places! The Good Reverend, MATCHEW Dining Out 10 03-19-2008 03:52 PM
How to trip gracefully... Cherry-Bomb Productions Lounge 11 08-16-2007 01:11 PM
Rose Beach: Conquering With the Power of Family Love Marc Music 0 06-28-2007 08:32 AM
HOW TO BECOME A GOOD DEMOCRAT Cherry-Bomb Productions Politics And Controversy 7 05-17-2007 01:36 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:55 PM.


Sponsors





Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0
Copyright GulfCoastBands.Com 2004-2008

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47